Why Most People Get It Wrong

New technology brings new opportunities, but planning your business based on the latest fads and gadgets makes for ad-hoc short-term planning, bad decisions, confusion and generally poor results. Plan your business objectives first, then find the technology to help you achieve them.

In your planning process, be open about the choice of technology and tools you could use. Be careful about your choice of system or platform. Don’t just stay with what you have for the sake of it, but don’t change just for the sake of it either.

Look at what you need the system to be able to do for your business and more importantly, for your customers. Plan on rolling out the implementation of the new system in phases. Start with a pilot if you need to, and learn from the pilot before proceeding ahead.

Don’t leave the choice of systems just up to your IT staff or advisors. If and when their choice turns out to be a poor one, it’s probably you who will share or take most of the responsibility for its selection.

Rather than helping you make better long-term strategic choices, your Information Technology staff and technical specialist advisors may increase the risks of you making poor decisions.

Many internal IT staff, external consultants and product vendors will, not surprisingly, have a blinkered view of the world and a bias towards working with and promoting what they know, understand and sell.

Focusing on a specific technology can bias you, side-track you and constrain you, and most technical staff will find it difficult, if not impossible to draw back far enough from the details of technology to advise and guide you on your fundamental business strategies.

Most technology specialists seem to live in either a technically blinkered comfort zone where they like to do what they know, or in a fun-filled playground where they continually want to try new things and play with the latest toys.

Given a choice, most techos like new toys and therefore it’s no wonder that many businesses play with new technology systems, often in undisciplined, unmanaged and unmeasured ad-hoc IT-driven games.

Relying on your technical specialists for your strategic business advice and guidance is folly, and typically leads to increased risks from poor choices, lack of focused direction and more ad hoc trial and error.

To make it even worse, technology options change so often you can’t keep up, and when you realize your so-called technical advisors are probably not able to give you the independent, unblinkered and unbiased advice you need, your challenges are made a lot tougher, adding to your overwhelm, confusion and uncertainty.

Too many people choose their technology before they really know what they need the technology to do for them. They settle for what it can do, and then compromise their business processes to suit the tech-system they have.

Whilst that may be pragmatic, it does not help a business be as good as it can be, but only as good as the technology allows the business to be. And then, they go further downhill by often blaming the technology and not using it properly.

Plan your business – and then get the technology to suit you. In a world of 100% niche solutions, the perfect system could be out there somewhere. You just need to find it – or let it find you through your community.

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